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The boy

The pages of Jean’s book made a satisfying deep rasp as she turned the next page. The thick, still air, the calm before a July storm, cloaked her in quiet and warmth. The bench could have easily been her couch.

A short, clean “Hi” cut through the stillness. A gangly boy, almost as tall as her, peered over at her book, before slumping uninvited at the other end of the bench

“What’s that?”

She turned the book over to show him the title: “It’s one of my favourites.”

This left little impression on the young man but he pulled himself further onto the bench, his legs sticking out in front, and quizzed her on her reading. He told her about his favourite books (they were unashamedly juvenile, as they should be for a boy his age). His eyes never left hers.

Jean placed her book back in her bag to better concentrate on this animated youngster.

He brushed a flopping fringe from his eyes and her mind was thrown back to a school desk and a brown-haired boy who’s hair flicks left her face hot and her jaw fixed shut.

Jamie had been in her class since primary school. A quick boy with an unshakable smile and boundless energy. In her mind she would run through jungles with him, climb mountains. He was adventure, wildness, joy. The quick wild boy and his untameable hair.

Jamie took her to her first school dance. He walked her home almost every afternoon after that. Their first date was a hike and a picnic. Proper Scottish rain turned their picnic into soggy mush and the smell of ozone clung to them as he rushed them into a cafe on the way home. Drying out over hot chocolates, he kissed her. Marshmallows still stuck to their noses. He laughed, blue eyes sparkling as he flicked his hair away in a practised, unconscious movement.

There were more kisses in the weeks to follow. Then they lost each other. Jamie’s mum got a new job and he was gone. Kisses were spent after that, wasted on others who could never give Jean the world.

She didn’t know what she’d lost until she found it again. At a friend’s wedding, out of the corner of her eye, Jean spotted a familiar hair flick and she never wasted a kiss again. They saw the world, less jungles and mountains but more adventure than she dreamed.

The young boy in front of her waved to get her attention:

“You were away on another planet!”

Jean laughed:

“Actually I was all over this one.”

The boy blew at the hair drooping over his eyes:

“Granny, Mum thinks I should get a hair cut, she says it’s ‘wild’.”

Jean smiled:

“There’s nothing wrong with ‘wild’.”

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If you enjoyed this and would like to read more of my work please pop along to my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

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Posted by on 16 June, 2018 in writing

 

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Cutting what you love

book-375456_1280I’ve been absent from here for a while. Basically my time has been eaten up by the fact that this ‘slow author’ got a lot faster at the end of last year. I joined in with NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) in November and completed my 50,000 (their word count threshold for a NaNoWriMo ‘win’). I wrote a kids book, it’s out on kindle and in paperback now, and you can find out more at the official website for the series. The first book only added up to 40,000 words, so completing the 50,000 even left me with a head start on the next book.

As soon as ‘Jack Reusen and the Fey Flame’ was written I moved on to ‘Jack Reusen and the Spark of Dreams’. It’s now in the middle of second draft stage and once again I’m feeling like a ‘slow author’. The raw wordage wasn’t as hard as I had expected, ever since I stopped micro-editing as I wrote (a great way to end up with a pile of half-written books).

I used to meticulously go over old material, editing as I went and adding more material at the end. As the text got larger this process would take longer until I struggled to get past chapter five or six. Do NOT do this, you will learn to hate your book, get so bored of your characters that you change them and then have to rewrite the achingly small portion of text you already have.

Almost every professional author ever, when asked, says that the only way to write a book is to ‘just write’ and it really is that simple. Just remember that what you make when you first sit down to write is like a sculptor selecting their rough stone. Simply make sure that the story you want is in there somewhere. From that rough draft you can hone something great: renaming characters, rewriting clunky scenes, even changing whole scenarios. We all write nonsense, we’ll sprint and polish off a few thousand words in an hour or two, write bleary eyed (and blearier brained) at two in the morning, or even simply fit in patchy ten or twenty minute bursts where we can. Just write, sort out the mistakes later. The honing, the majority of the research, the careful selection of names for characters and places, all of this is draft number two stuff and even when you’re on the second draft don’t forget that you can still move into a third draft if you’re not happy.

The toughest rule I set myself was purposefully making my chapters longer than they needed to be. Trimming five-hundred words takes me almost as long as writing two thousand but its necessary. Each of my chapters should be around two-thousand words but I purposefully write the first draft at two and a half thousand per chapter. Doing this makes me certain that my second draft will make the best use of its word count. It’s a good habit to get into and it lets ‘writer John’ enjoy writing, safe in the knowledge that ‘editor John’ will sort it all out on the second pass.

It’s not easy and sometimes I have to cut whole paragraphs that, despite how great they may be, do nothing for the book as a whole. If I was offering up advice I’d follow the ‘just write’ part with ‘and trust that you can edit later’. Anyway, I’m off back to my editing, thanks for stopping by and feel free to share your own writing experiences below, Cheers, John

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UPDATE 16/06/18): The book is ready. Both books one and two of the series are now available on Amazon. You can find these and more of my work on my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

 

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Dealing with disability in fiction

Got this image from 'silver collection'

Got this image from ‘silver collection

One of my main characters (Justin) is disabled and I’m finding that this provides an interesting challenge for an able-bodied writer like myself. To write about a disabled person’s life, even in the third person can be tricky but one of the key issues I try to keep in mind is the difference in the capacity for movement that any individual might display from one day to the next.

Though the nature of my character’s disability is quite complex (and it would reveal a lot of the plot of my book if I discussed it here), I can at least touch on the basics. His movement is limited by degrees. I’ve purposely decided not to give him a fixed and unchanging degree of movement, this is for a number of reasons but primary among them is realism. From my experience, when I think of people with disabilities and incapacities that I’ve known, or that I currently know, I’ve seen a surprising fluctuation in both in their capacity for movement and level of discomfort from one day to the next. For example, someone with enduring back problems may have fairly fluid movement one day, only to stiffen up in pain the next.

I want my characters to feel real, I want Justin to be able to surprise himself in the heroics he can achieve, just as much as any hero I write. For this I need adrenaline to be able to help him when he needs it but I also want to point out the increased pain and discomfort which may plague him in the aftermath. If I just decided that he can only move so quickly, or that he can only endure so much then I’m putting limits on his character that I wouldn’t put on an able-bodied character. In fiction your heroes need to be able to surprise the reader in the deeds they can perform. If I were to limit any character in a fixed way it would detract from that, and worse still, it would exclude the character from the standard behaviours expected of a hero/ine.

All of my character’s difficulties are physical (in a general sense), in terms of his mental capacities they’re around average, though Justin is very wise. I imagine the formulation of their character would take a very different form for a character with a mental disability or one who suffers from mental illness. I’d be very interested to hear any other writers’ takes on this. Have you written a disabled character before? How did you deal with their limits? What form did their character development take? Are you disabled yourself, if so are there any aspects of your life/experience that you feel should be present in the characterisation of a fictional character with a disability? As always thanks for reading and I hope to hear from you either here or over on twitter, All the best, John

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UPDATE 16/06/18): Chasing Humanity has become something of a labour of love over the past few years. However I have found time to publish a few other books. If you enjoyed this and would like to read more of my work please pop along to my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

 

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Birds do it, bees do it, but should fictional teens do it?

aguttes-chastity-beltWhen writing a book for young adults, as I am, there comes a point where you have to deal with the inevitable: the truth of the matter is that teenagers have relationships, and a difficult issue when it comes to depicting modern teen relationships is sex.

So what do you do if you want to write a book for young adults, that appeals to the realities of their lives, whilst avoiding the pitfalls of making more chaste teens feel alienated? Basically, an issue I ran into a few months back, like a solid brick wall, was; should teen characters have sex?

My two characters are hardly even teens (they’re both almost twenty) but in the end I decided to take a route for them that walks a subtle line between an actual real-world physical relationship and something less overtly sexual. I definitely don’t want the two of them to be ‘just friends’ but I also have to be careful not to make things too intense for younger readers. I only recently realised that my books might appeal to a younger demographic and keeping them in mind has forced me to make some pretty hefty changes.

One of the key issues I’m having to deal with are the difficulties in plot points that are dependent on their sleeping together. When I say ‘sleeping together’ I don’t mean anything sexual, I simply mean that on a number of occasions a key plot point is dependent on them staying over at each other’s houses.

I pondered this problem for a long time. Originally my main characters had a physical relationship and back then I planned out chapters and chapters of plot based around the two of them being present at the same houses at various times of the day and, importantly, I just assumed that they would be sleeping at each-others’ homes.

However, through the course of time (and after having my wife proof-read my first few chapters) it became clear that if my characters’ sexual relationship remained as overt as it was in earlier drafts the book(s) would be unlikely to be appropriate for/appeal to the teen/pre-teen demographic I’m now hoping to reach.

This is a difficult decision and it’s meant that so many different things have had to change. Though the plot of my book is still very similar to what it was when I started, I’m still having to traipse back through old material to make sure that it doesn’t refer to what was previously a much more overtly physical relationship.

I definitely need them to be boyfriend and girlfriend, however the nature of this relationship has changed significantly. This can sometimes weigh a little heavy on me as I’m not sure if this makes me a dishonest author, pandering to preferred reader, rather than writing what I originally set out to do. That said, I have to be realistic about this. I want people to read my books and it’s no use writing a book that will only appeal to me. If my primary aim is to provide an entertaining reading experience for a wide range of readers, I have to at least avoid writing about things that are either inappropriate or unappealing for those readers.

To be honest I’m actually pretty comfortable with my characters the way they are now. This change in how I define their relationship means I can concentrate more on the day-to-day aspects, rather than trying to pay too much attention to the nature and language of their physical encounters (I have to confess, I’m not the best at writing sex scenes, I’m just going to have to leave that to Anne Rice). Changing their physical encounters, from being overtly described to simply existing as subtle hints, actually seems to have allowed me to explore a more realistic and believable relationship for my two main characters.

Despite this, I’m still concerned that there may be something less ‘literarily honest’ about the way I’ve written my redraft. Of those of you who do write I’m very interested to see what you have done (if anything) to alter your characters, and/or plot, to make it more readable for your target demographic. Am I alone in doing this or do other authors think (even occasionally) about their target readers when sitting down to write? As always thanks for reading and I welcome any comments you have in the comments section below, Cheers, John

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If you enjoyed this and would like to read more of my work please pop along to my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

 
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Posted by on 6 October, 2014 in writing hints and tips

 

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The realities of slow authorship

melting_clock_lifestyle_1000Everyone has a book in them and anyone can churn that book out, what differs from individual to individual are the limits that stand between them and that finished manuscript. For me that limiting factor is time, I work near-on full-time and, because my wife and I work opposing shifts, I also spend a considerable portion of my week as a SAHD (stay at home dad). Time is my nemesis.

My writing gets jammed in wherever I can fit it and I feel the constant awareness that I should be writing more. I rush to get the kids to bed, clean away supper dishes, and generally get the house in order with enough time spare before my wife gets home from work. During my days off there are things in the house that need fixed, groceries to buy, meals to cook and things to take the kids to and pick them up from. I am on a constant quest for some alone time in front of my computer.

I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. Though the individual details may differ I imagine that the demands of normal, every-day life will be one of the most tenacious challenges for most authors and would-be authors. However I’ve spoken to many other writers who suffer from a very different problem; the dreaded writer’s-block. This is a problem that I haven’t had in literally years, and I wonder if time and inspiration are linked.

Perhaps there’s something akin to the expression ‘absence makes the heart grow stronger’ that goes on with writing. I simply don’t have time to fall out with my muse: when I find the opportunity to write I grab her with both hands and the rest takes care of itself. Maybe it’s got more to do with the old adage that if you want something done ask someone who’s busy.

The sad fact might simply be that the blocked among us have too much time to avoid the pitfalls of procrastination and getting stuck in their own heads. Whilst those of us with too little time end up with so much creativity bottled up that when the time comes to write they never feel they’ve done enough, or that it’s been drafted enough to be any good.

Somewhere out there there must be authors who have by some means found themselves in the perfect middle, with just enough time to write but not so much that they get distracted. In the mean time the rest of us just have to envy one another’s glut of either time or inspiration.

My own approach seems to be working fairly well (if unnervingly slowly), I’ve already got a completed book under my belt (you can check it out here), my next book is almost past it’s first third in completed form, and I have two others with a few completed chapters and full book plans. These facts fill me with hope but I can’t help but be a realist about time constraints: this next book is taking a while (a long while). I promised myself back when I turned thirty that by forty I’ll have written ten books and have recorded an album, but with each twenty-minute writing session that counts as my entire authorship of the day, I feel that goal slip ever further. My only choice is to keep pushing and keep my fingers crossed, on top of that maybe I have to learn to make writing more of a priority in my day.

What’s been your experience of trying to write? Do you lack time or inspiration? What tricks have you picked up to get over these obstacles? Let me know in the comments below and as always thanks for reading. By the way, you can also follow me on twitter by following this link, all the best, John

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If you enjoyed this and would like to read more of my work please pop along to my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

 
 

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Keeping momentum

keep momentumIn the past few weeks I’ve somehow managed to start finding time to write again (mostly thanks to the fact that my wife and I have decided to take turns at getting some writing in down at the local library). One thing that I really struggled with was the fact that after a few months away from it I didn’t really know my characters any more. To be honest I spent a lot of time editing and then re-editing my first three chapters basically just so that I could get to know them again.

Some of the edits changed them quite a bit and I’ll now never be able to say how their original incarnations might have turned out if I hadn’t lost momentum. That said I like my characters as they appear now and I’m also aware that they’ll probably go through more alterations as the book progresses. The important development that I’ve made over the past week or so is that I now have a complete step-by-step chapter plan.

This existed in my head before but I started to realise that my characters were divulging to much about themselves in the first few chapters. Rather than getting to know them piece by piece I was trying too hard to fit in my character descriptions at the very beginning. I decided to take it more slowly and allow situations within the plot to work as a means of displaying the true personalities of my characters.

helen grant

Helen’s latest book ‘Silent Saturday‘, Secret societies, breaking and entering and mysterious disappearances.

I guess that’s the root of my tip for this post, don’t lose momentum and be sure to give yourself a pretty detailed guide so you don’t lose your way. Thanks to a wee twitter conversation with author Helen Grant I can safely say that this approach has backing from a successfully published author. Another thing to be said for detailed plans is that with them in place it becomes easier to figure out what you’re going to be writing when you sit down at the keyboard (your task is infinitely more simple; just flesh out your plan, piece by piece). So far I’m finding it to be a fantastic preventative against writer’s block.

All the best, thanks for reading and please feel free to let me know about any techniques you’ve discovered to help keep momentum going and prevent getting side-tracked. Cheers, John

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UPDATE 16/06/18): If you enjoyed this and would like to read more of my work please pop along to my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

 

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Aside

This is a common technique for getting the creative juices flowing and this week I embark on writing new material (not simply editing old chapters as I have been doing), so I feel the need to amp up my game. basically you juxtipose seemingly unrelated subjects and try to write a story from them. Here’s my list (one from my bag, one from outside the bus and one that hit me at random). Random first: a blue whale, now my bag: a shopping list and outside the bus: a church.

Morris looked around him, stretching as far as the horizon in all directions lay desolate miles of frigid water. Funnily enough staying afloat wasn’t causing him too much bother but he knew he had to get out of the water soon or the cold would kill him.

The cold must have been getting to him because his memory just wouldn’t seem to provide any inkling of how he’d got here. He remembered taking a walk past the harbour of the fishing village where he lived. He had just taken his crumpled little grocery list out of his shirt pocket when a storm started to kick up and the next thing he knew he was bobbing around in the sea. Cold fingers of sea water were clawing through his mind and wiping his senses away. His teeth felt like they were going to burst and he could barely see straight. If he didn’t try swimming to shore soon he would lose any sense he had left.

He had always been a good swimmer so his movement through the water came naturally to him. To his bemused relief after just a few minutes of mindless movement he began to notice something solid on the horizon, ‘well that was easy’.

The land in the distance was both cruelly easy to see and alarmingly hard to get to. What took minutes to appear in his field of vision took Morris almost an hour to reach. When he finally got close enough to the shore to make out buildings he locked on to a hardy little granite church perched just behind a rocky patch of beach. Hauling his body through the icy water, Morris noticed that he’d lost all feeling in his fingers or toes, he needed to get out soon.

Morris dredged the last of his energy lumbering up onto the rocky shore. Thankful to be back on solid ground he hugged the gritty sand and lumpy stones beneath him and rejoiced as he heard someone running towards him. He tried to yell but his brain was numb and all that escaped his lips was a long drawn out moan.

“My God this one’s massive, I’ll have to call in a lot of help on this! They’re never going to believe me.”

Morris didn’t understand what this guy was talking about he leaned over to get a better view and saw a tiny man, like a pixie, take a miniscule mobile phone out of his pocket and make a call.

“Yeh Alec, it’s Robert, you’re never going to believe what’s washed up this time. I’m no expert but it sure looks like a blue whale.”

Panicking Morris craned himself round to confirm the reality that was already beginning to set in. As the last vestiges of his old memories ebbed away the whale led out a deep and penetrating groan.

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UPDATE 16/06/18): If you enjoyed this and would like to read more of my work please pop along to my author page on Amazon. Simply click this link.

Some Excercise

 
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Posted by on 10 September, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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