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Monthly Archives: April 2015

Cutting what you love

book-375456_1280I’ve been absent from here for a while. Basically my time has been eaten up by the fact that this ‘slow author’ got a lot faster at the end of last year. I joined in with NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) in November and completed my 50,000 (their word count threshold for a NaNoWriMo ‘win’). I wrote a kids book, it’s out on kindle and in paperback now, and you can find out more at the official website for the series. The first book only added up to 40,000 words, so completing the 50,000 even left me with a head start on the next book.

As soon as ‘Jack Reusen and the Fey Flame’ was written I moved on to ‘Jack Reusen and the Spark of Dreams’. It’s now in the middle of second draft stage and once again I’m feeling like a ‘slow author’. The raw wordage wasn’t as hard as I had expected, ever since I stopped micro-editing as I wrote (a great way to end up with a pile of half-written books).

I used to meticulously go over old material, editing as I went and adding more material at the end. As the text got larger this process would take longer until I struggled to get past chapter five or six. Do NOT do this, you will learn to hate your book, get so bored of your characters that you change them and then have to rewrite the achingly small portion of text you already have.

Almost every professional author ever, when asked, says that the only way to write a book is to ‘just write’ and it really is that simple. Just remember that what you make when you first sit down to write is like a sculptor selecting their rough stone. Simply make sure that the story you want is in there somewhere. From that rough draft you can hone something great: renaming characters, rewriting clunky scenes, even changing whole scenarios. We all write nonsense, we’ll sprint and polish off a few thousand words in an hour or two, write bleary eyed (and blearier brained) at two in the morning, or even simply fit in patchy ten or twenty minute bursts where we can. Just write, sort out the mistakes later. The honing, the majority of the research, the careful selection of names for characters and places, all of this is draft number two stuff and even when you’re on the second draft don’t forget that you can still move into a third draft if you’re not happy.

The toughest rule I set myself was purposefully making my chapters longer than they needed to be. Trimming five-hundred words takes me almost as long as writing two thousand but its necessary. Each of my chapters should be around two-thousand words but I purposefully write the first draft at two and a half thousand per chapter. Doing this makes me certain that my second draft will make the best use of its word count. It’s a good habit to get into and it lets ‘writer John’ enjoy writing, safe in the knowledge that ‘editor John’ will sort it all out on the second pass.

It’s not easy and sometimes I have to cut whole paragraphs that, despite how great they may be, do nothing for the book as a whole. If I was offering up advice I’d follow the ‘just write’ part with ‘and trust that you can edit later’. Anyway, I’m off back to my editing, thanks for stopping by and feel free to share your own writing experiences below, Cheers, John

 

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